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Monday, August 5
 

10:00am EDT

02. Opening Keynote: Build Your Legacy - Being a Champion with Behavior Analysis - Presidents Hall
Whether you are a student, Behavior Analyst, Educator, or a parent, you will find yourself building a legacy. As Behavior Analysis’ exposure increases not only in the world of autism but also in mainstream education in general, each of us has a more and more important role to play. What will your legacy be and how do you ensure an impact? Not surprisingly, the answers are unlikely to be found in graduate school and sometimes require hard lessons that only come with experience. This presentation will discuss various challenges faced by practitioners and educators using individual examples and from a large-scale perspective. Additionally, it will highlight the different issues we must address, the importance of doing so for our field, and just how dangerous the future could be if we do not act now. If you struggled with a response about your impact or do not see the clear call to action, get ready to work because you have more to give…to your field, your clients, and to yourself. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Nikki Dickens

Nikki Dickens

Emily N. Dickens, M.S., BCBA—or “Nikki”— is the Director of the FSU Early Childhood Autism Program in Panama City, a nonprofit clinic and community outreach organization. She received her Masters from FSU Panama City in 2005, returned in 2013 to oversee the ECAP practicum... Read More →



Monday August 5, 2019 10:00am - 11:00am EDT
TBA

11:00am EDT

03. Current Effective Practices in a Representative District - Presidents Hall
The PaTTAN Autism Initiative ABA Supports currently provides consultation to over 600 classrooms across Pennsylvania, including rural, suburban, and urban schools.  This brief session will highlight the Moon Area School District and their collaborative efforts with the Autism Initiative, involving seven classrooms spanning Kindergarten through High School students.  The partnership comprises dedicated teachers, paraprofessionals, administrators, internal coaches, behavior analysts, therapists, and amazing students.  The presentation will provide video examples of the use of reinforcement-based instruction based on the science of behavior analysis. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Ryan Delaney

Ryan Delaney

Ryan Delaney is an Educational Consultant for the PATTAN Autism Initiative supporting classrooms throughout Pennsylvania. He received his master’s degree at the University of Pittsburgh and earned his BCBA through the Penn State University ABA certificate program.



Monday August 5, 2019 11:00am - 11:30am EDT
TBA

1:00pm EDT

04. Introduction to the Conference and Applied Behavior Analysis - Presidents Hall 4
Presentation will include a brief overview of evidence-based interventions for students with autism. Since most evidence suggests the importance of applied behavior analysis (ABA) in guiding interventions for individuals with autism, many sessions at the National Autism Conference focus on ABA. During this session, the basic principles of ABA will be presented for beginners and those who want a review of those principles. This session is appropriate for parents and educators. The content of this session will prepare attendees to get the most out of this year’s conference. Information presented will be supported by videos of ABA-based interventions. Additionally, the session will include a brief review of how data may be presented in the various ABA-based sessions occurring at the conference. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Ashley Harned

Ashley Harned

Ashley Harned, M.Ed., BCBA, works as an educational consultant with PaTTAN’s Autism Initiative. Prior to coming to PaTTAN, Ashley served as a special education teacher for K–4 students with high- and low-incidence disabilities for eight years. Ashley secured her undergraduate... Read More →
AP

Abigail Pastorella

Abigail Pastorella, M.S., BCBA, LBS is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst, Licensed Behavior Specialist, and Certified School Psychologist for the State of Pennsylvania. Abigail earned her Master of Science degree from Millersville University and her Bachelor of Science degree from... Read More →



Monday August 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
TBA

1:00pm EDT

06. Early Social Responding and Verbal Behavior: An Analysis of Current Applications - Deans Hall 1 & 2
Since the publication of the pioneering work by Hart and Risley (1975, 1978), naturalistic-based interventions, focusing on the acquisition and generalization of social communication, have been increasingly incorporated into Applied Behavior Analytic programs for children with autism. In the past two decades, several researchers have drawn from this literature to develop and divulge comprehensive early intervention models that are said to focus specifically on early social behavior (e.g., Dawson et al., 2009; Rogers & Dawson, 2010). Given the syndrome specific and primary deficits of autism, intervention that aims to address impairments in social responding early on may result in clinically significant outcomes for this population. Because language is typically acquired in the context of and maintained by social interaction, early focus on establishing people as a source of reinforcement may enable children to acquire verbal behavior under more environmentally valid sources of control. The current presentation will firstly briefly review the sparse literature on naturalistic interventions and the extent to which, as a scientific community, we have developed both an analysis and subsequent techniques to address and alter the social deficits in autism. The presentation will particularly focus on operationally defining and illustrating strategies to establish early social responding by referring to current behavioral interpretations of joint attention and eye contact as a conditioned reinforcer and derived evidence-based applications to establish language in the context of, to contact and maintain social interaction. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Francesca degli Espinosa

Francesca degli Espinosa

Francesca began her career in behaviour analysis working as a tutor for a child with autism, in the UK in 1996. During that time she became interested in interventions that could both define and establish generalised learning: the ability to demonstrate novel responses within and... Read More →



Monday August 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
TBA

1:00pm EDT

10. Effects of Pace of Instruction on Skill Acquisition and Problem Behavior - Presidents Hall 1
This session will review some common misconceptions about how students with autism should be taught with a focus on instructional pace and skills sequence. A brief review of research related to the topic will be included as well as pragmatic suggestions on how to arrange instructional materials, teaching environments, and structure teaching sessions while maintaining a brisk pace of instruction to keep students engaged. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA


Speakers
avatar for Willow Martin Hozella

Willow Martin Hozella

Educational Consultant, PaTTAN
Willow Hozella, BCBA, is an educational consultant with PaTTAN's Autism Initiative. He provides in-class consultation to autism support classrooms throughout Pennsylvania, working directly with students, teachers, para-educators, and other staff to implement evidence-based instructional... Read More →



Monday August 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
TBA

1:00pm EDT

05. Recent Research on Teaching Verbal Behavior to Children with Autism - Presidents Hall 2
A recent review of empirical applications of Skinner’s Verbal Behavior (1957) to interventions for children with autism showed that the number of studies published each year has increased over time (DeSouza, Akers, & Fisher, 2017). Additionally, research on applications of Skinner’s Analysis of Verbal Behavior spans a variety of peer-reviewed outlets. Recent research has continued to examine methods to directly teach a variety of verbal operants including mands, tacts, intraverbals, and echoics as well as methods to produce emergent responding across non-targeted operants. While the increase in publications is exciting and beneficial in advancing evidence-based interventions, it may be challenging practitioners to keep up with the literature. The current presentation will provide an overview of several recent studies on teaching verbal behavior to children with autism. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Alice Shillingsburg

Alice Shillingsburg

Dr. Alice Shillingsburg obtained her doctoral degree and training in clinical child psychology and behavior analysis at Auburn University. She is a licensed psychologist and Board Certified Behavior Analyst at the doctoral level. She is the senior vice president of Applied Verbal... Read More →



Monday August 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
TBA

1:00pm EDT

08. The Evolution of a Science: A Brief History of Behavior Analysis, Including Applications to Autism Treatment - Presidents Hall 3
Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for A. Charles Catania

A. Charles Catania

A. Charles Catania, Professor Emeritus at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), is Past-President of the Association for Behavior Analysis and of Division 25 of the American Psychological Association. He has been Editor of the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of... Read More →



Monday August 5, 2019 1:00pm - 4:00pm EDT
TBA
 
Tuesday, August 6
 

9:00am EDT

13. A Step-Wise Approach to Behavioral Intervention: Implications for Behavioral Consultation - Presidents Hall 1
The presenter will describe a philosophy of behavioral intervention that is based on empirical evidence. He will begin with a discussion of strategies for prevention of severe behavior disorders. Next, he will describe the role of "healthy contingencies" in both the prevention and early intervention of behavior disorders. Third, he will discuss age-appropriate contingency management strategies. Fourth, he will discuss individualized intervention strategies. Finally, he will discuss limits in the scope of practice for behavior analysts, and the importance of collaboration with other professionals. Throughout, the presenter will offer time for questions and discussion. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Timothy R. Vollmer

Timothy R. Vollmer

Timothy R. Vollmer received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1992. From 1992 until 1996 he was on the psychology faculty at Louisiana State University. From 1996 to 1998 he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He returned to the University... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

14. Analyzing and Interpreting Trends in Data: Dancing with the Data - Room 108
Behavior Analysis is an evidence-based, data-driven approach to solving problems. Baseline data provide a wealth of information about behavior in addition to providing a benchmark against which to evaluate the effectiveness of treatments. This workshop will describe patterns of behavior frequently observed in baseline measurement and what they tell us about variable responsible for behavior. The workshop will also evaluate how to compare baseline and treatment data and what it they tell us about motivating operations and learning effects. His workshop will also examine the importance of tracking down sources of variability and how this can influence our understanding of the controlling stimuli, contexts and functions of behaviors. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Ron Van Houten

Ron Van Houten

Dr. Van Houten received his BA from SUNY at Stony Brook and his MA and Ph.D. from Dalhousie University where he received training in the Experimental Analysis of Behavior. He is currently Professor of Psychology at Western Michigan University. Dr. Van Houten has published 42 papers... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

16. An Update on Legal Issues for Students with Autism Spectrum Disorders - Room 208
This session will provide an overview of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act, Section 504, related federal agency policy interpretations and state laws, and court decisions specific to students with ASD, with a particular focus on eligibility and methodology issues. The emphasis will be on recent legal developments since the corresponding presentation during last year's conference. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Perry A. Zirkel

Perry A. Zirkel

Perry A. Zirkel is university professor emeritus of education and law at Lehigh University, where he formerly was dean of the College of Education, subsequently held the Iacocca Chair in Education for its five-year term. He has a Ph.D. in Educational Administration and a J.D. from... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

18. Project ImPACT (Improving Parents as Communication Teachers) - A Parent Training Curriculum from Birth to Age - Room 207
The importance of the direct involvement of parents in the education of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) has been widely recognized (e.g. National Autism Center, 2009; National Research Council, 2001). Project ImPACT (Ingersoll and Dvortcsak, 2010) is an evidenced-based, parent-training curriculum that has been used to improve children with ASD’s social communication skills. Evaluation of this program has revealed that parents increased their knowledge of the intervention techniques (Ingersoll and Dvortcsak 2006; Ingersoll and Wainer 2011), improved accuracy of implementation of the intervention techniques (Ingersoll and Wainer, 2011), were highly satisfied with the program (Ingersoll and Dvortcsak 2006; Ingersoll and Wainer 2011), and ascribed gains in their child’s social communication skills directly to the program (Ingersoll and Dvortcsak 2006; Ingersoll and Wainer,2011). Child measures revealed an increase in language use (Ingersoll and Wainer, 2011). Teachers reported that participating parents’ ability to utilize techniques and the child’s social communication skills improved because of the program (Ingersoll and Dvortcsak 2006; Ingersoll and Wainer 2011). Topics will include the following: the importance of parent training as part of the intervention for children with ASD; overview of Project ImPACT; parent-mediated intervention model based on best practices; successful elements of PMI; intervention targets and social communication skills; naturalistic development behavioral intervention; and, preparation for Project ImPACT. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Anna Dvortcsak

Anna Dvortcsak

Anna Dvortcsak, MS, CCC-SLP, is a speech pathologist in private practice in Portland, Oregon. She provides consulting, parent training and individual speech and language services to families and children with autism. Anna has experience conducting research on the efficacy of treatment... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

15. Teaching Verbal Behavior and Functional Skills to Persons with Moderate to Severe Disabilities (including Autism) - Presidents Hall 3 & 4
Persons with autism and other developmental disabilities have benefited from treatment programs that emphasize the application of behavior analytic principles. Many of these programs are now informed by B.F. Skinner’s, (1957) analysis of verbal behavior. The purpose of this workshop is to provide an extension of this approach to treatment of persons with moderate to severe disabilities. Several curricula will be discussed including The Essential for Living. The Essential for Living is an assessment and curriculum uniquely designed to address the learning difficulties of this group of persons. With its foundation in the analysis of verbal behavior, these materials provide a functional curriculum for children and adults with severe learning needs. An overview of this approach along with video illustrations of treatment methods in educational settings across several essential domains, e.g., self-care, verbal behavior training within the routine of daily events, and reducing problem behavior by teaching tolerating and waiting skills, along with others. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Vincent J. Carbone

Vincent J. Carbone

Vincent J. Carbone, Ed.D., is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral and New York state licensed behavior analyst. He received his graduate training in applied behavior analysis (ABA) at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, under the supervision of W. Scott Wood. He currently... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

17. Toward a Functional Analysis of Social Behavior - Room 206
Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA
Social behavior is a topic of enormous scientific importance, spanning disciplines from anthropology to neuroscience. Although the topic has been widely studied outside behavior analysis, it has received only scant attention over the years within the field. This is unfortunate because behavior analysis has much to contribute to this field, both methodologically and conceptually. My main aim in this talk to summarize what is known about social behavior (e.g., cooperation, resource sharing, imitation, social interaction) across species and settings, and to outline a functional approach to conceptualizing and studying it. I will call attention to areas in which behavior-analytic concepts and methods have the potential for substantive contributions to this rapidly growing field. I will also discuss some tangible ways in which this type of functional analysis can be translated into practical applications, including special populations for whom social behavior poses significant challenges.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Hackenberg

Tim Hackenberg

Tim Hackenberg received a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine in 1982 and a doctorate in psychology from Temple University in 1987, under the supervision of Philip Hineline. He held a postdoctoral research position at the University of Minnesota with Travis... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

20. Teaching Advanced Mands - Presidents Hall 2
The basic principle of mand training is that the student will learn under conditions of motivation to ask for what they want. “Want it, say it, get it” is the basic formula. The mand repertoire utilized by proficient speakers in day-to-day interactions, however, involves more complicated environment-behavior relations. This session will describe complex multiply controlled mands and will review instructional protocols and skill sequences relative to complex mands. Practical considerations for addressing motivation to initiate the social interaction necessary for complex mands will be discussed. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Mike Miklos

Mike Miklos

Mike Miklos, M.S., BCBA, is a behavior analyst and Pennsylvania-certified school psychologist employed as an educational consultant for PaTTAN. His responsibilities have included training staff, developing systems for data-driven decisions, completing functional behavior assessments... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

29. (repeat of 15) Teaching Verbal Behavior and Functional Skills to Persons with Moderate to Severe Disabilities (including Autism) - Deans Hall 1 & 2
Persons with autism and other developmental disabilities have benefited from treatment programs that emphasize the application of behavior analytic principles. Many of these programs are now informed by B.F. Skinner’s, (1957) analysis of verbal behavior. The purpose of this workshop is to provide an extension of this approach to treatment of persons with moderate to severe disabilities. Several curricula will be discussed including The Essential for Living. The Essential for Living is an assessment and curriculum uniquely designed to address the learning difficulties of this group of persons. With its foundation in the analysis of verbal behavior, these materials provide a functional curriculum for children and adults with severe learning needs. An overview of this approach along with video illustrations of treatment methods in educational settings across several essential domains, e.g., self-care, verbal behavior training within the routine of daily events, and reducing problem behavior by teaching tolerating and waiting skills, along with others. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Vincent J. Carbone

Vincent J. Carbone

Vincent J. Carbone, Ed.D., is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst-Doctoral and New York state licensed behavior analyst. He received his graduate training in applied behavior analysis (ABA) at Drake University, Des Moines, Iowa, under the supervision of W. Scott Wood. He currently... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

31. (repeat of 17) Toward a Functional Analysis of Social Behavior - Room 208
Social behavior is a topic of enormous scientific importance, spanning disciplines from anthropology to neuroscience. Although the topic has been widely studied outside behavior analysis, it has received only scant attention over the years within the field. This is unfortunate because behavior analysis has much to contribute to this field, both methodologically and conceptually. My main aim in this talk to summarize what is known about social behavior (e.g., cooperation, resource sharing, imitation, social interaction) across species and settings, and to outline a functional approach to conceptualizing and studying it. I will call attention to areas in which behavior-analytic concepts and methods have the potential for substantive contributions to this rapidly growing field. I will also discuss some tangible ways in which this type of functional analysis can be translated into practical applications, including special populations for whom social behavior poses significant challenges. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Tim Hackenberg

Tim Hackenberg

Tim Hackenberg received a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine in 1982 and a doctorate in psychology from Temple University in 1987, under the supervision of Philip Hineline. He held a postdoctoral research position at the University of Minnesota with Travis... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

34. Trial-based Functional Analysis: Current Research and Applications - Room 106
Functional analyses are commonly used to determine the function of problem behavior. They involve the direct manipulation of various environmental variables to determine their influence on problem behavior in order to direct treatment development. Although research supports the use of functional analyses, they may not always be feasible in all settings (e.g., schools) due to limited resources, primarily access to controlled environments. The trial-based functional analysis (Bloom, Iwata, Fritz, Roscoe, & Carreau, 2011) was developed to allow teachers to participate in conducting functional analysis in their classrooms, with brief assessment trials embedded into ongoing activities. This presentation reviews current research in trial-based functional analysis, and examines conceptual, ethical, and procedural issues related to its use. A new model for using trial-based functional analysis in clinic settings will be reviewed. Data analysis and new approaches that use signal detection theory and other methods to identify thresholds for determination of function will be presented. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Bloom

Sarah Bloom

Sarah Bloom received her PhD in Psychology at the University of Florida in 2008. She was an assistant professor in the Applied Behavior Analysis area of the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University from 2008 to 2013. She is currently an associate... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

27. (repeat of 13) A Step-Wise Approach to Behavioral Intervention: Implications for Behavioral Consultation - Presidents Hall 2
The presenter will describe a philosophy of behavioral intervention that is based on empirical evidence. He will begin with a discussion of strategies for prevention of severe behavior disorders. Next, he will describe the role of "healthy contingencies" in both the prevention and early intervention of behavior disorders. Third, he will discuss age-appropriate contingency management strategies. Fourth, he will discuss individualized intervention strategies. Finally, he will discuss limits in the scope of practice for behavior analysts, and the importance of collaboration with other professionals. Throughout, the presenter will offer time for questions and discussion. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Timothy R. Vollmer

Timothy R. Vollmer

Timothy R. Vollmer received his Ph.D. from the University of Florida in 1992. From 1992 until 1996 he was on the psychology faculty at Louisiana State University. From 1996 to 1998 he was on the faculty at the University of Pennsylvania Medical School. He returned to the University... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

28. Is My Child Really Included? - Presidents Hall 3 & 4
Every parent wants their child to be included and be a part of their school community and ultimately included in the community at large. However, it can often be a challenge to accomplish the goal of meaningful participation while also ensuring optimal outcomes and safety of all involved. This presentation will provide guidelines for parents and teams to consider as well as a review of critical skill sets that result in successful participation in general education settings, home, and community settings. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Amiris Dipuglia

Amiris Dipuglia

PaTTAN
Amiris DiPuglia, M.D., obtained her degree as a medical doctor in 1991 from the Pontificate Catholic University Mother, and master's degree in the Dominican Republic. When her eldest son Alexander was diagnosed with autism, she abandoned her medical career and pursued her certification... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

30. Supervision Savvy - Room 206
In order to ensure that trainees possess the skills necessary to become competent behavioral analysts who are prepared to represent the field with integrity, it is essential for supervisors to take a behavior analytic and data driven approach to providing individualized quality supervision. This training will cover the components of competency-based supervision including systems for assessment, maintenance, and progress monitoring of trainee skill sets, use of behavior skills training (BST), and the delivery of effective performance feedback. Additionally, this training with review current requirements and upcoming changes to the supervision model. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB Supervision, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Kittenbrink

Rachel Kittenbrink

Dr. Rachel Kittenbrink is the founder and director of Pittsburgh Behavioral Services, a small non-profit service agency providing direct intensive ABA services and consultation to programs for individuals with autism and learning differences in the western PA region. Rachel has experience... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA
 
Wednesday, August 7
 

9:00am EDT

43. Teaching "Learning How to Learn" - A Functional Analysis of Curriculum Programming for Children with Autism - Presidents Hall 4
Following the publication of the Me book, the first textbook that outlined a behaviorally based instructional sequence for children with autism, numerous curriculum manuals have been published. Manuals have been invaluable in providing both parents and practitioners with sequences of objectives and behavioral procedures to establish verbal and nonverbal skills in children with autism. While some manuals have organized their objectives across traditional developmental areas, favoring a more structural approach to teach language skills, other have employed a functional approach to categorize language objectives. Regardless of their conceptual premise, all published manuals share common characteristics: they all provide a list of objectives that are operationally defined, for each objective they describe a prompt hierarchy, and a corresponding mastery criterion based on a number of specific responses to be demonstrated. In this presentation, I will attempt to illustrate a functional analysis of curriculum development and suggest an additional level of specificity in the design and implementation of behaviorally derived instructional sequences for children with autism. Firstly, I will suggest a way of organizing skills based on whether they constitute a generalized operant class or cumulative/finite skills and how such classification necessarily induces a consideration of mastery criteria for each skill. Secondly, I will endeavor to demonstrate how when behavioral topographies are brought under the relevant and multiple sources of environmental control they lead to rapid and generalized learning, enabling the child to acquire novel responses with minimal teaching. This conceptual framework will be illustrated in relation to two pivotal skills that may lay the foundation for the development of multiply controlled generalized verbal behavior: Simple and conditional discriminative learning and naming. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Francesca degli Espinosa

Francesca degli Espinosa

Francesca began her career in behaviour analysis working as a tutor for a child with autism, in the UK in 1996. During that time she became interested in interventions that could both define and establish generalised learning: the ability to demonstrate novel responses within and... Read More →



Wednesday August 7, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

48. Maintaining Employee Performance: Specific Strategies for Training and Maintaining High Levels of Staff Fidelity - Deans Hall 1
When thinking about service delivery to individuals with autism, it is reasonable to stress the importance of well-trained staff. The teachers and direct-care workers shoulder huge responsibility when delivering treatment for the individuals they serve. The staff are expected to implement instructional protocols and behavior treatment plans that, if successful, should result in individuals with autism possessing a wider skill set, and engaging in skills and competencies more independently, with greater efficiency, all that should lead to a higher quality of life. Thus, it is critical to service provision that staff are trained to implement protocols and plans with great efficiency and fidelity. The quality of the interventions is important too, in that these interventions must result in accomplishing the stated goals that should lead to great client outcomes. But procedures designed to effectively train staff that leads to long-term maintenance must be identified and used for these purposes. This presentation will focus on many issues related to the training and maintenance to achieve those goals. Different training models will be presented, with outcome data being reported. Low- and high-tech staff training strategies will be discussed, along with common errors that staff make when implementing instructional and behavioral plans. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Zane

Thomas Zane

Dr. Thomas Zane is a Professor of Practice and the Director of Online Behavior Analysis programs in the Department of Applied Behavioral Science at the University of Kansas. Dr. Zane earned his Bachelor’s and Master’s degree in psychology at Western Michigan University and his... Read More →



Wednesday August 7, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

66. Establishing Effective Supervisory and Consultative Practices: A Data Driven Approach - Room 106
This session will teach participants how to design, implement, and evaluate supervisory and consultative practices. Participants will learn how to use behavioral skills training with supervisees and professionals receiving consultation. The presentation will provide participants with guidelines for evaluating performance expectations of both the trainee and the supervisor or consultant. Participants will learn key characteristics of effective performance feedback. Throughout the presentation, examples and practical resources will be shared. Suggestions for preventing and addressing barriers to implementation as well as ethical considerations will also be discussed. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB Supervision, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Amy Naccarelli

Amy Naccarelli

Amy Dunn-Naccarelli, Ed.D., BCBA, is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and certified teacher in Elementary, Early Childhood, and Special Education. Amy earned her Master of Education and Bachelor of Arts degrees from Arcadia University. Amy holds a Doctor of Education degree in Educational... Read More →



Wednesday August 7, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

47. The Poisoned Cue and its Implications for Teaching and Social Interactions - Room 206
Much is known about discriminative stimuli established under either reinforcing or aversive stimuli and about how they work as conditioned reinforcers or conditioned aversive stimuli. However, little is known experimentally about discriminative stimuli established with both reinforcing as well as aversive events. It has been reported that the interaction between reinforcing and aversive events makes the discriminative function somewhat different from other discriminative stimuli (see Hearst & Sidman, 1961). Karen Pryor (2002) called this phenomenon the Poisoned Cue. She suggested that a cue, or SD, that is established using both reinforcing and aversive events leads to the breakdown of the behavior both preceding and following the cue. This may be due to an increase in avoidance behaviors and the uncertainty that exists regarding the consequence that will follow. The Poisoned Cue phenomenon is important because it reflects the majority of teaching situations in the real world. SDs in the real world are rarely taught with purely positive reinforcement or purely aversive consequences. This presentation will show an experimental analysis of the Poisoned Cue, and techniques to identify situations that might involve Poisoned Cues. It will also discuss ways to overcome these cues. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Jesus Rosales-Ruiz

Jesus Rosales-Ruiz

Jesús Rosales-Ruiz is an associate professor at the University of North Texas in the Department of Behavior Analysis. He obtained his Ph.D. from the University of Kansas in 1995, under the mentorship of two pioneers in the field of behavior analysis, Donald M. Baer and Ogden R. Lindsley... Read More →



Wednesday August 7, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

64. (repeat of 43) Teaching "Learning How to Learn" - A Functional Analysis of Curriculum Programming for Children with Autism - Presidents Hall 4
Following the publication of the Me book, the first textbook that outlined a behaviorally based instructional sequence for children with autism, numerous curriculum manuals have been published. Manuals have been invaluable in providing both parents and practitioners with sequences of objectives and behavioral procedures to establish verbal and nonverbal skills in children with autism. While some manuals have organized their objectives across traditional developmental areas, favoring a more structural approach to teach language skills, other have employed a functional approach to categorize language objectives. Regardless of their conceptual premise, all published manuals share common characteristics: they all provide a list of objectives that are operationally defined, for each objective they describe a prompt hierarchy, and a corresponding mastery criterion based on a number of specific responses to be demonstrated. In this presentation, I will attempt to illustrate a functional analysis of curriculum development and suggest an additional level of specificity in the design and implementation of behaviorally derived instructional sequences for children with autism. Firstly, I will suggest a way of organizing skills based on whether they constitute a generalized operant class or cumulative/finite skills and how such classification necessarily induces a consideration of mastery criteria for each skill. Secondly, I will endeavor to demonstrate how when behavioral topographies are brought under the relevant and multiple sources of environmental control they lead to rapid and generalized learning, enabling the child to acquire novel responses with minimal teaching. This conceptual framework will be illustrated in relation to two pivotal skills that may lay the foundation for the development of multiply controlled generalized verbal behavior: Simple and conditional discriminative learning and naming. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT

Speakers
avatar for Francesca degli Espinosa

Francesca degli Espinosa

Francesca began her career in behaviour analysis working as a tutor for a child with autism, in the UK in 1996. During that time she became interested in interventions that could both define and establish generalised learning: the ability to demonstrate novel responses within and... Read More →



Wednesday August 7, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

65. Preparing Students with ASD for Life In and After High School: Lessons from the Field - Presidents Hall 1
The post school landscape for adolescents with ASD, both with and without intellectual disability, is concerning, with studies consistently indicating that young adults are leaving college at higher rates, underemployed or unemployed, and are socially isolated. There are a number of practices that have been identified as predictors of post school success for individuals with various disabilities, including appropriate transition assessments, integration with same-age peers, and providing work based learning experiences. There are a number of barriers for providing these opportunities, including limited time and flexibility for students accessing the “Future Ready” curriculum, staffing, limited opportunities, and perceived disinterest from peers. The Center on Secondary Education for Students with ASD (CSESA) conducted a randomized control trial (RCT) to evaluate a comprehensive intervention model for high school students with ASD (n=546). The CSESA model targets four core areas: social competence, academics, independence and transition. Part of the model includes collaborating with school staff, students to first identify high priority needs, then implement evidence-based strategies, including peer mediated interventions, and work based learning experiences. This presentation will highlight the top tips from staff members at 30 high schools across the country and will include practical examples, photos, and videos, along with data about student needs and experiences from these schools. Details related to HOW staff can implement appropriate transition assessments, relationship/community building activities with peers in general education settings, work based learning experiences, and WITH WHOM staff may consider collaborating will be included.
In our work with over 1,000 high school staff members, we frequently face barriers to these interventions for students with ASD. This session will provide solutions to several structural limitations of high schools and will better allow high school staff to implement these interventions, which are a proven practice in improving the transition-related outcomes for students with ASD. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Kara Hume

Kara Hume

Dr. Kara Hume is an Associate Professor in the School of Education at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and Advanced Research Scientist at the Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute. She has worked in the field of special education for 25 years in various capacities... Read More →



Wednesday August 7, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA
 
Thursday, August 8
 

9:00am EDT

71. Establishing Generative Verbal Learning for Children with Autism - Presidents Hall 1
Typically, developing children demonstrate an explosion of language skills between the ages of 2 and 3 (Hart & Risley, 1995). A child acquires new speaker and listener skills daily, often without direct training or reinforcement. However, many children with autism struggle with, or fail to make this critical linguistic leap. This learning barrier could be related to a child’s inability to benefit from generative verbal learning. Generative verbal learning occurs when existing verbal skills enable or accelerate the acquisition of other verbal skills, without direct teaching or reinforcement (Rosales-Ruiz & Baer, 1997). An account of generative learning based on Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior will be described (e.g., Horne & Lowe, 1996; Greer & Ross, 2008; Staats, 1996). It will be suggested that there are several different types of generative effects that collectively allow for the rapid and efficient acquisition of more advanced verbal repertoires. The VB-MAPP contains a number of milestones that can be identified as measures of generative learning. These milestones will be described, along with ways to read a child’s existing VB-MAPP in terms of generative verbal learning scores. Finally, suggestions will be offered for how and when to establish generative repertoires for children with autism. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Mark Sundberg

Mark Sundberg

Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D., BCBA-D, received his doctorate in applied behavior analysis from Western Michigan University in1980, under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. He is the author of the VB-MAPP: Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program, and co-author of the... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

75. Early Intervention, Inclusion, and ABA: Transforming from Professional to Parent - Room 208
This session will highlight research validated instructional strategies for meeting the needs of young children with autism in the home, clinic, and inclusive settings.  Procedures for intervention, tools for inclusion, and data collection materials will be shared. Videos and explanations of various formats for instruction will be presented. Topics discussed will include mand training, natural environment teaching, intensive teaching, targeting social behavior, managing problem behavior, and toilet training. The presentation will also touch on parent and family training and trouble-shooting instructional programming for learners with a wide-range of communicative levels. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Rachel Kittenbrink

Rachel Kittenbrink

Dr. Rachel Kittenbrink is the founder and director of Pittsburgh Behavioral Services, a small non-profit service agency providing direct intensive ABA services and consultation to programs for individuals with autism and learning differences in the western PA region. Rachel has experience... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

78. The Role of Fluency in Programming for Children with Language Delays - Presidents Hall 4
One educational method that is highly effective and supported by published evidence is fluency training. Fluency training is implemented for skills that a child can demonstrate but not at a speed that is efficient. It serves to build the rate at which particular skills are emitted. Many educators are familiar with fluency for academic skills such as words read correctly per minute. This session will discuss atomic repertoires and the component/composite analysis for operants using fluency training. Rate data is a valid measurement and fluency instruction is an effective teaching tool, however, an analysis of when to use such tools is important for maximizing effective instructional time. Skills taught to fluency aims serve to build retention, endurance, stability and promote generalization for more complex language. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Lori Chamberlain

Lori Chamberlain

Lori Chamberlain is a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and a consultant for the PaTTAN Autism Initiative. She has worked in the educational field for twenty years. As a teacher in general education, she wanted to learn how to help the students in her classroom that needed extra assistance... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

73. A Behavioral Interpretation of Mathematics and Logic - Room 206
In this workshop I discuss some of the behavioral contingencies underlying mathematical and logical concepts.  Even cave men must have found it useful to count, to estimate, to sort, and to match; to evaluate relative size, length, and duration; to tact temporal relationships such as before, next, after, past, future, and the length of the seasons; to tact physical relationships such as above, below, adjacent, near, far, heavy, and light.  But each such act of quantification or estimation must have been biased by a host of conditions in effect at that time or place. The relatively objective and abstract verbal rules of logic and mathematics must have had their roots in practical rules of thumb shaped by long exposure to such natural contingencies.
The elements of logic and mathematics are examples of verbal behavior, and their great power and usefulness derives from that fact. They facilitate model building and the formal structures and abstractions of science. These models generate precise predictions that go far beyond normal experience, and they have permitted astonishing advances in science and technology. I translate these elements into corresponding verbal units: Textual and transcriptive behavior, tacts and abstract tacts, intraverbals, intraverbal chains, and intraverbal frames. Problem solving is interpreted as bringing cycles of supplementary stimuli to bear on the task at hand. In light of this analysis, I suggest reasons that logic and mathematics are commonly hard to learn and point to procedures that may prove useful when teaching such concepts to students at every level of ability. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for David Palmer

David Palmer

With undergraduate degrees in geology and English, Dave Palmer knew nothing about behaviorism until he stumbled on Skinner’s Walden Two. He was electrified and soon became a public nuisance trying to persuade all-and-sundry of the merits of a behavioral interpretation of human problems... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

76. Converging Qualities of Personal Competence: What They Are and How to Teach Them - Presidents Hall 3
What is to be taught? How is learning to occur? What makes for a truly successful learner? Educators are increasingly looking to the learning and psychological sciences for help in answering these questions. Covering content is no longer considered adequate, nor is a simple emphasis on the purely academic domain sufficient. Educators are being challenged with developing competencies that extend beyond what might be called the cognitive domain. This is especially important for children with developmental challenges. Often efforts focus solely on competencies in what might be termed the “cognitive domain.” In addition to cognitive competencies, three other competencies have been identified that some have suggested are essential for learners to master metacognitive, social/emotional, and motivational competencies. Although there is an emerging consensus that these are important, there is not wide- spread agreement on precisely how these competencies are defined and how they may be acquired. This workshop provides a behavioral description of each competency, how each may be taught, and how the competencies converge, that is, how each competency may contribute an important component (or components) to another. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for T.V. Joe Layng

T.V. Joe Layng

T. V. Joe Layng has nearly 50 years of experience in the experimental and applied analysis of behavior with a particular focus on the design of teaching/learning environments. in 1971 he founded the Center for Innovative Design and Programed Instruction at Western Illinois University... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

85. (repeat of 73) A Behavioral Interpretation of Mathematics and Logic - Room 205
In this workshop I discuss some of the behavioral contingencies underlying mathematical and logical concepts.  Even cave men must have found it useful to count, to estimate, to sort, and to match; to evaluate relative size, length, and duration; to tact temporal relationships such as before, next, after, past, future, and the length of the seasons; to tact physical relationships such as above, below, adjacent, near, far, heavy, and light.  But each such act of quantification or estimation must have been biased by a host of conditions in effect at that time or place. The relatively objective and abstract verbal rules of logic and mathematics must have had their roots in practical rules of thumb shaped by long exposure to such natural contingencies.
The elements of logic and mathematics are examples of verbal behavior, and their great power and usefulness derives from that fact. They facilitate model building and the formal structures and abstractions of science. These models generate precise predictions that go far beyond normal experience, and they have permitted astonishing advances in science and technology. I translate these elements into corresponding verbal units: Textual and transcriptive behavior, tacts and abstract tacts, intraverbals, intraverbal chains, and intraverbal frames. Problem solving is interpreted as bringing cycles of supplementary stimuli to bear on the task at hand. In light of this analysis, I suggest reasons that logic and mathematics are commonly hard to learn and point to procedures that may prove useful when teaching such concepts to students at every level of ability. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for David Palmer

David Palmer

With undergraduate degrees in geology and English, Dave Palmer knew nothing about behaviorism until he stumbled on Skinner’s Walden Two. He was electrified and soon became a public nuisance trying to persuade all-and-sundry of the merits of a behavioral interpretation of human problems... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

89. Getting and Keeping the Job - Room 106
Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Jane Thierfeld Brown

Jane Thierfeld Brown

Jane Thierfeld Brown, Ed.D., is assistant clinical professor at Yale Child Study, Yale Medical School, and director of College Autism Spectrum and former director of Student Services at the University of Connecticut School of Law. She has worked in disability services for 37 years... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

83. (repeat of 71) Establishing Generative Verbal Learning for Children with Autism - Presidents Hall 1 & 2
Typically, developing children demonstrate an explosion of language skills between the ages of 2 and 3 (Hart & Risley, 1995). A child acquires new speaker and listener skills daily, often without direct training or reinforcement. However, many children with autism struggle with, or fail to make this critical linguistic leap. This learning barrier could be related to a child’s inability to benefit from generative verbal learning. Generative verbal learning occurs when existing verbal skills enable or accelerate the acquisition of other verbal skills, without direct teaching or reinforcement (Rosales-Ruiz & Baer, 1997). An account of generative learning based on Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior will be described (e.g., Horne & Lowe, 1996; Greer & Ross, 2008; Staats, 1996). It will be suggested that there are several different types of generative effects that collectively allow for the rapid and efficient acquisition of more advanced verbal repertoires. The VB-MAPP contains a number of milestones that can be identified as measures of generative learning. These milestones will be described, along with ways to read a child’s existing VB-MAPP in terms of generative verbal learning scores. Finally, suggestions will be offered for how and when to establish generative repertoires for children with autism. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Mark Sundberg

Mark Sundberg

Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D., BCBA-D, received his doctorate in applied behavior analysis from Western Michigan University in1980, under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. He is the author of the VB-MAPP: Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program, and co-author of the... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

87. Token Reinforcement: Bridging the Gap between Science and Application - Room 206
Token economies are among the oldest and most widely used procedures in applied behavior analysis. Unlike other successful technologies in behavior analysis, however, there has been little substantive contact between applied and basic research with token reinforcement over the years. Despite some 50 years of applied work on token economies, surprisingly little is known about the variables responsible for their effectiveness; they are rarely based on an understanding of the basic principles involved. This is beginning to change, as recent translational research is beginning to uncover the behavioral roots of token reinforcement. In this talk, I will discuss some research from laboratory and applied settings, designed to illustrate the benefits of an integrated approach to research and application. I will also provide concrete examples of how such knowledge of basic processes is translated into clinical practice. This type of function-based applied research has the potential to rapidly advance both the science and application of token systems. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, INFANT, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Tim Hackenberg

Tim Hackenberg

Tim Hackenberg received a B.A. in psychology from the University of California, Irvine in 1982 and a doctorate in psychology from Temple University in 1987, under the supervision of Philip Hineline. He held a postdoctoral research position at the University of Minnesota with Travis... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA