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Tuesday, August 6
 

1:15pm EDT

34. Trial-based Functional Analysis: Current Research and Applications - Room 106
Functional analyses are commonly used to determine the function of problem behavior. They involve the direct manipulation of various environmental variables to determine their influence on problem behavior in order to direct treatment development. Although research supports the use of functional analyses, they may not always be feasible in all settings (e.g., schools) due to limited resources, primarily access to controlled environments. The trial-based functional analysis (Bloom, Iwata, Fritz, Roscoe, & Carreau, 2011) was developed to allow teachers to participate in conducting functional analysis in their classrooms, with brief assessment trials embedded into ongoing activities. This presentation reviews current research in trial-based functional analysis, and examines conceptual, ethical, and procedural issues related to its use. A new model for using trial-based functional analysis in clinic settings will be reviewed. Data analysis and new approaches that use signal detection theory and other methods to identify thresholds for determination of function will be presented. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Sarah Bloom

Sarah Bloom

Sarah Bloom received her PhD in Psychology at the University of Florida in 2008. She was an assistant professor in the Applied Behavior Analysis area of the Department of Special Education and Rehabilitation at Utah State University from 2008 to 2013. She is currently an associate... Read More →



Tuesday August 6, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA
 
Thursday, August 8
 

9:00am EDT

71. Establishing Generative Verbal Learning for Children with Autism - Presidents Hall 1
Typically, developing children demonstrate an explosion of language skills between the ages of 2 and 3 (Hart & Risley, 1995). A child acquires new speaker and listener skills daily, often without direct training or reinforcement. However, many children with autism struggle with, or fail to make this critical linguistic leap. This learning barrier could be related to a child’s inability to benefit from generative verbal learning. Generative verbal learning occurs when existing verbal skills enable or accelerate the acquisition of other verbal skills, without direct teaching or reinforcement (Rosales-Ruiz & Baer, 1997). An account of generative learning based on Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior will be described (e.g., Horne & Lowe, 1996; Greer & Ross, 2008; Staats, 1996). It will be suggested that there are several different types of generative effects that collectively allow for the rapid and efficient acquisition of more advanced verbal repertoires. The VB-MAPP contains a number of milestones that can be identified as measures of generative learning. These milestones will be described, along with ways to read a child’s existing VB-MAPP in terms of generative verbal learning scores. Finally, suggestions will be offered for how and when to establish generative repertoires for children with autism. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Mark Sundberg

Mark Sundberg

Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D., BCBA-D, received his doctorate in applied behavior analysis from Western Michigan University in1980, under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. He is the author of the VB-MAPP: Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program, and co-author of the... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

9:00am EDT

73. A Behavioral Interpretation of Mathematics and Logic - Room 206
In this workshop I discuss some of the behavioral contingencies underlying mathematical and logical concepts.  Even cave men must have found it useful to count, to estimate, to sort, and to match; to evaluate relative size, length, and duration; to tact temporal relationships such as before, next, after, past, future, and the length of the seasons; to tact physical relationships such as above, below, adjacent, near, far, heavy, and light.  But each such act of quantification or estimation must have been biased by a host of conditions in effect at that time or place. The relatively objective and abstract verbal rules of logic and mathematics must have had their roots in practical rules of thumb shaped by long exposure to such natural contingencies.
The elements of logic and mathematics are examples of verbal behavior, and their great power and usefulness derives from that fact. They facilitate model building and the formal structures and abstractions of science. These models generate precise predictions that go far beyond normal experience, and they have permitted astonishing advances in science and technology. I translate these elements into corresponding verbal units: Textual and transcriptive behavior, tacts and abstract tacts, intraverbals, intraverbal chains, and intraverbal frames. Problem solving is interpreted as bringing cycles of supplementary stimuli to bear on the task at hand. In light of this analysis, I suggest reasons that logic and mathematics are commonly hard to learn and point to procedures that may prove useful when teaching such concepts to students at every level of ability. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for David Palmer

David Palmer

With undergraduate degrees in geology and English, Dave Palmer knew nothing about behaviorism until he stumbled on Skinner’s Walden Two. He was electrified and soon became a public nuisance trying to persuade all-and-sundry of the merits of a behavioral interpretation of human problems... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 9:00am - 12:00pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

85. (repeat of 73) A Behavioral Interpretation of Mathematics and Logic - Room 205
In this workshop I discuss some of the behavioral contingencies underlying mathematical and logical concepts.  Even cave men must have found it useful to count, to estimate, to sort, and to match; to evaluate relative size, length, and duration; to tact temporal relationships such as before, next, after, past, future, and the length of the seasons; to tact physical relationships such as above, below, adjacent, near, far, heavy, and light.  But each such act of quantification or estimation must have been biased by a host of conditions in effect at that time or place. The relatively objective and abstract verbal rules of logic and mathematics must have had their roots in practical rules of thumb shaped by long exposure to such natural contingencies.
The elements of logic and mathematics are examples of verbal behavior, and their great power and usefulness derives from that fact. They facilitate model building and the formal structures and abstractions of science. These models generate precise predictions that go far beyond normal experience, and they have permitted astonishing advances in science and technology. I translate these elements into corresponding verbal units: Textual and transcriptive behavior, tacts and abstract tacts, intraverbals, intraverbal chains, and intraverbal frames. Problem solving is interpreted as bringing cycles of supplementary stimuli to bear on the task at hand. In light of this analysis, I suggest reasons that logic and mathematics are commonly hard to learn and point to procedures that may prove useful when teaching such concepts to students at every level of ability. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for David Palmer

David Palmer

With undergraduate degrees in geology and English, Dave Palmer knew nothing about behaviorism until he stumbled on Skinner’s Walden Two. He was electrified and soon became a public nuisance trying to persuade all-and-sundry of the merits of a behavioral interpretation of human problems... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA

1:15pm EDT

83. (repeat of 71) Establishing Generative Verbal Learning for Children with Autism - Presidents Hall 1 & 2
Typically, developing children demonstrate an explosion of language skills between the ages of 2 and 3 (Hart & Risley, 1995). A child acquires new speaker and listener skills daily, often without direct training or reinforcement. However, many children with autism struggle with, or fail to make this critical linguistic leap. This learning barrier could be related to a child’s inability to benefit from generative verbal learning. Generative verbal learning occurs when existing verbal skills enable or accelerate the acquisition of other verbal skills, without direct teaching or reinforcement (Rosales-Ruiz & Baer, 1997). An account of generative learning based on Skinner’s (1957) analysis of verbal behavior will be described (e.g., Horne & Lowe, 1996; Greer & Ross, 2008; Staats, 1996). It will be suggested that there are several different types of generative effects that collectively allow for the rapid and efficient acquisition of more advanced verbal repertoires. The VB-MAPP contains a number of milestones that can be identified as measures of generative learning. These milestones will be described, along with ways to read a child’s existing VB-MAPP in terms of generative verbal learning scores. Finally, suggestions will be offered for how and when to establish generative repertoires for children with autism. Credits: Act 48, SW, Psych, PT, OT, BACB, ASHA

Speakers
avatar for Mark Sundberg

Mark Sundberg

Mark L. Sundberg, Ph.D., BCBA-D, received his doctorate in applied behavior analysis from Western Michigan University in1980, under the direction of Dr. Jack Michael. He is the author of the VB-MAPP: Verbal Behavior Milestones Assessment and Placement Program, and co-author of the... Read More →



Thursday August 8, 2019 1:15pm - 4:15pm EDT
TBA